Parent Supervision Requirements during Swimming Lessons

  • Date: 11 October 2017
  • Category: General
Dad and Daughter Rec Swimming

Did you know that if your child is under the age of 10 and participating in a swimming lesson the ‘Watch Around Water’ parental supervision guidelines still apply?

Why:

To provide the safest possible environment for your child.

Regardless of the activity, your child is participating in at the centre, the ‘Watch Around Water’ supervision requirements for parents/guardians still apply. Even when your child is with a swimming teacher.

What do I need to do?

Children under 5 years:

o Watch the lesson.

o Locate yourself as close as practicable to the lesson, eg: sitting in the chairs located around the pool.

o Directly handover and collect your child at the beginning and end of the class.

Children under 10 years:

o Watch the lesson.

o Locate yourself within viewing distance of the lesson and have no physical or structural barriers between you and the class.

o Directly handover and collect your child at the beginning and end of the class.

Other benefits:

By watching and being located close to your child’s lesson:

 Your child is able to show you their achievements,

 You’re available to immediately accompany your child to the bathroom.

Swimming outside lesson times: A friendly reminder of the active parental supervision requirements when your child isn’t in a lesson. Children under 5 must be accompanied into the water and remain within arms reach. Children under 10 must be clearly and constantly visible and remain directly accessible.

Thank you:

The safety of your child is paramount. We thank you and appreciate your support to provide your child with safe and positive experiences in the aquatic environment.

FAQ’s for Parents/Guardians

Why do I need to watch when my child is with a qualified swimming teacher?

Swimming teachers are trained to supervise your child and use moving patterns in lessons to support this. Parents watching provide an additional control to further minimise risk to your child.

I’m in the water with my 18 month old’s lesson at the same time as my 4-year-old has his lesson. How can I watch my 4 year old? I don’t want to change times.

We appreciate the convenience and time management benefits of having your children’s lessons at the same time. This is not preferred as you are unable to watch your 4 year old or his lesson. If changing times isn’t an option we ask that you let your 4 year old’s teacher know during handover where you are located. This way if your 4 year old needs you, we know how to find you quickly. To ensure the safety of your 4 year old, direct handover at the beginning and conclusion of his class is required.

My two children have lessons at the same time but in different areas. It’s difficult to watch them both.

Being as close as possible to children aged under 5 is required by the Watch Around Water guidelines and being in line of sight of children aged under 10. If you cannot be in line of sight of your older child’s lesson please let their teacher know during handover where you are located. We recommend you enrol your children to enable you to meet the guidelines. Parents/guardians watching provide an additional control to further minimise risk to your child.

The only opportunity I have to swim is during my son’s lesson. It’s important for my own health and wellbeing.

The supervision of your child, even during a lesson, is first priority. Swimming lessons is not an opportunity for respite. The ‘Watch Around Water’ supervision requirements for parents/guardians apply even when your child is with a swimming teacher. Parents/guardians watching provide an additional control to further minimise risk to your child.

My 9-year-old doesn’t care if I’m not watching; do I still need to watch the class?

Yes. It’s a safety issue. The ‘Watch Around Water’ supervision requirements for parents/guardians apply even when your child is with a swimming teacher. Parents/guardians watching provide an additional control to further minimise risk to your child.

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